Heart Conditions

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High intensity training better for coronary artery disease patients

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Two groups of stable patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) regularly walked on treadmills three times a week for ten weeks. One group walked at high intensity (80-90% of VO2peak); the other groups walked at moderate intensity (50-60% of VO2peak)

The results from this study, High intensity aerobic interval exercise is superior to moderate intensity exercise for increasing aerobic capacity in patients with coronary artery disease were:

After training VO2peak increased by 17.9% (P=0.012) in the high intensity group and 7.9% (P=0.038) in the moderate intensity group. The training-induced adaptation was significantly higher in the high intensity group (P=0.011).

Their conclusion:

High intensity aerobic interval exercise is superior to moderate exercise for increasing VO2peak in stable CAD-patients.

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Study: High Intensity training beneficial and safe for those with heart disease

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New research examines the question of whether high-intensity exercise is beneficial for heart disease patients. The result:

“The four studies, which were composed of patients who either had acute coronary syndrome or angina pectoris, confirmed previous findings that high-intensity exercise is safe, even for patients with CHD” – quote is from this article High-Intensity Exercise for People With Heart Disease.

Another quote from the article:

"When we compared VO2max before and after the training period, we found that the number of training sessions, the subject's age or baseline fitness levels had no impact, but the intensity of the intervals had a significant effect, and seems to be the most important characteristic of an effective interval session.”

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Strength Training Shown To Lower Blood Pressure

The following meta-analysis, Dynamic resistance exercise and resting blood pressure in adults: a meta-analysis, reported the following:

“A total of nine studies consisting of 259 subjects (144 exercise, 115 control) and 18 groups (9 exercise, 9 control) significant treatment effect ( 3) reductions were found across all designs and categories for both systolic and diastolic blood pressure”.

The study concludes: “meta-analytic review of included studies suggests that dynamic resistance exercise reduces resting systolic and diastolic blood pressure in adults”.

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