Kelly Personal Training Blog

  • Going All Out Again

    Posted by on January 3, 2014
    personal trainers at work personal training New Orleans

    A series of injuries including a ruptured Achilles tendon resulted in nine month of no exercise - none. I didn’t even work for a couple of months. I started back lifting what I could handle and began a sprint training program three times a week on a stationary recumbent bike - 120 seconds warm-up followed by a 30 second all-out sprint followed by at 90 second easy recovery pace. Eventually I worked up to a total of eight sprints. If you can do more you are pacing yourself.

  • Overtraining Part Two

    Posted by on December 6, 2013
    personal trainers at work personal training New Orleans

    Frankie was a fanatical exerciser. He exercised with a trainer four times a week for an hour before going to work. On the weekends he went for hours-long bike rides. He decided to give our training program a try, and I put him through a workout. He worked out hard. The last exercise was the chest press and he was spent. During the last couple of reps he made agonizing sounds like the Mel Gibson character in Braveheart – really unnecessary but it got him through to the end. It was a little bit scary.

    I suspected that he was over-trained, so for the next few weeks I convinced him to train just once a week, and I put him through moderately intense sessions. Six week later I put him through the workout we did in our initial session. On the last exercise the chest press he completed the exercise without the dramatic Braveheart sounds of cry Freedom.

  • Overtraining Part One

    Posted by on December 1, 2013
    personal trainers at work personal training New Orleans

    Overtraining occurs when one trains too often, too long, too hard or any combination of these. Plenty of other factors in life can contribute as well such as lack of sleep, poor nutrition, and stress. Overtraining appears to build up slowly and can go unnoticed. When I first began training I was hell-bent on increasing the weights I lifted. I thought I was improving, but I was fooling myself. I’d change the cadence a bit, take an extra second rest between reps, ever so slightly decrease the range of motion, subtly cheat your way through the sticking point a ¼ second in order to complete the rep and voila I improved. On paper I continued to improve but I was gradually becoming increasingly over-trained. The end result is usually burn-out, injury or sickness. I had my share of that.

    From what I have observed it take weeks to build up overtraining and weeks for it to dissipate. Example One:

  • Outrunning Cheetahs

    Posted by on November 16, 2013
    personal trainers at work personal training New Orleans

    From this BBC article Kenyans chase down and catch goat-killing cheetahs these quotes:

    “The men waited until the hottest part of the day before launching the chase over a distance of four miles (6.4km).

    The cheetahs got so tired they could not run any more. The villagers captured them alive and handed them over to the Kenya Wildlife Service.”

    And this:

    “He said he decided to return to his village to organise their capture at a time of day when cheetahs get very tired and usually rest in shade.

    "I was sipping a cup of tea when I saw them killing another goat," he said, explaining that this was early in the morning.

    He said he waited until several hours later when the sun was high to go after them.

    "I called some youths and we ran after them," he said.

    "We caught them and we brought them to the local authorities."

  • High intensity training better for coronary artery disease patients

    Posted by on November 8, 2013
    personal trainers at work personal training New Orleans

    Two groups of stable patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) regularly walked on treadmills three times a week for ten weeks. One group walked at high intensity (80-90% of VO2peak); the other groups walked at moderate intensity (50-60% of VO2peak)

    The results from this study, High intensity aerobic interval exercise is superior to moderate intensity exercise for increasing aerobic capacity in patients with coronary artery disease were:

    After training VO2peak increased by 17.9% (P=0.012) in the high intensity group and 7.9% (P=0.038) in the moderate intensity group. The training-induced adaptation was significantly higher in the high intensity group (P=0.011).

    Their conclusion:

    High intensity aerobic interval exercise is superior to moderate exercise for increasing VO2peak in stable CAD-patients.

  • Increased blood flow and lower BP with strength training

    Posted by on October 29, 2013
    personal trainers at work personal training New Orleans

    From this article Weight Training Has Unique Heart Benefits, Study Suggests:

    “An acute bout of resistance exercise shows many favorable cardiovascular benefits and should therefore be considered as part of a daily exercise training program".

    When compared to aerobic training resistance training resulted in increased blood flow to the limbs and a longer-lasting drop in blood pressure after exercise.

    Another quote:

    "Resistance exercise may offer greater benefits from the increases in blood flow to active muscles and could be implemented as companion to an aerobic training regimen, according to the new study".

    Especially because of its ability to increase blood flow to active muscles, weight training could be a valuable companion to an aerobic training regimen. "This may be of greatest importance to women, as they can derive important weight-bearing benefits of resistance training to help prevent and/or treat osteoporosis,"

  • One year anniversary at our new New Orleans location

    Posted by on October 17, 2013
    personal trainers at work personal training New Orleans

    Has it really been over a year since we’ve moved the gym, renovated a building and changed our name? They say time flies when you are having fun...and it has because we are... Kelly Personal Training, nee Ultimate Fitness, is now located near the blossoming Freret St. corridor nestled in a beautiful uptown neighborhood . Our corner building was originally a grocery store. The large windows are still in place. In the early morning the sun rises on Danneel St. giving us a beautiful beginning to the day.

    We may have changed our space but our mission is the same - to provide a safe, efficient way to improve life by becoming stronger. And we do it while having fun. Many of our “people” have been with us for years. Relationships have grown. We know about each others’ lives, favorite books, what was cooked or what restaurant was highlighted this week. Most of our trainers have been with us for over five years, a few over ten.

  • Benefits of exercise for the brain may be transient

    Posted by on October 8, 2013
    personal trainers at work personal training New Orleans

    A New York times article asks Do the Brain Benefits of Exercise Last? In a word, no. It appears that desirable changes are not permanent, much like when a person stops exercising the body reverts to its former de-conditioned state.

    Experimenters took two groups of rats, one group exercised on a treadmill and the other did not exercise. Afterward, the researchers
    compared the animals’ performance on the memory test, as well as the number of new brain cells in the hippocampus of each group of rats.

    They found that:

    ”The rats that had run were much faster on the water maze test than the control animals. They also had at least twice as many newborn neurons in the hippocampus.

    But those advantages faded after several more weeks of not running. The brains of the animals that had been inactive for three weeks contained far fewer newborn neurons than the brains of the animals that had rested for only one week. The brains of the animals that had been inactive for six weeks had fewer still”.

    More:
  • Kelly Personal Training Austin Upgraded

    Posted by on October 6, 2013
    personal trainers at work personal training New Orleans

    Kelly Personal Training New Orleans moved to a new location this past year. Meanwhile, Kelly Personal Training Austin has had a total makeover - new floors (no small feat with several tons of equipment to move), newly painted walls with accent walls and stripes, new signage, tinted windows, new furniture, remodeled bath and shower rooms, two new pieces of equipment to bring our total to 25 pieces, and Stella, the red cocker, got a new pack member, the brown and white cocker named Bella both shown here on the yellow couch.

  • Growing new brain cells by exercising

    Posted by on October 6, 2013
    personal trainers at work personal training New Orleans

    Regular exercise improves our ability to think and remember through the creation of new brain cells, a process known as neurogenesis.

    From this NY Times article, How Testosterone May Alter the Brain After Exercise:

    “A new study found that male sex hormones surge in the brain after exercise and could be helping to remodel the mind”.

    They tested to see if rats produce the testosterone in the brain by shutting off production in the testes (castration). Further, some of the animals also were injected with a drug that negated the effects of testosterone produced by the brain. Some rats were not altered. They were then divided into groups, sedentary and active rats. The active rats exercise on treadmills for two weeks; the sedentary rats played video games (not really).

    Quote from the article: